(+351) 217908388, Ext.: 40337/38
cesem@fcsh.unl.pt

Carme Juncadella

RESEARCHER IN TRAINING

Carme Juncadella

Ph.D Student
a60547@campus.fcsh.unl.pt
Biography:
She was born in 1963 in Catalonia. There she studied music and philosophy. She lived in Paris for ten years, where she obtained the Willems Music Pedagogy Diploma in 1991 and worked as a music teacher in various institutions. In 2002 was qualified as Alexander Technique teacher, that she studied in Oxford and Brighton. In 2013 completed a Master of Science in Psychotherapy Studies in the University of Sheffield. Since 2013 she lives in Portugal and works as an Alexander Technique teacher and music teacher for Waldorf teacher trainees. She also was the conductor of the Aljezur Internacinal Choir for 5 years doing concerts in cooperation with other artists such as Madalena Vitorino and the Camerata do Algarve. Founded and is part of the direction of the Cultural Association “O Corvo e a Raposa”, which organizes cultural events inluding early music concerts and residences since 2016. In 2020 finished a degree in Early music with the speciality of harpsichord in the Escola Superior de Musica de Lisboa. She plays the organetto since 2016, that she studied with Guillermo Perez and Cristina Alis, and is member of the Medieval music ensemble “Na Rota do Peregrino”. She is currently a doctoral student in Music Sciences at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa. In additon to her artistic activities as conductor and performer, she has translated to Spanish E. Willems’ books:”Le Livre de Solfege de l’eleve” and “Le livre de Solfege du Maitre”. Also has done the research on oriental music for the performance of “Coracoes ao Alto” created by Margarida Mestre for the Gulbenkian Foundation.
Post-Doc/PhD/Master Thesis
Title Ph.D.: Effects of the Alexander Technique in undergraduate singing students.
Orientation:
Resume:

This study intends to explore the effects of Alexander Technique lessons in undergraduate singing students. There are two general principal consensuses among singing and voice teachers: the first is that breathing is a primary aspect of voice teaching and the second is that body functioning improves when counterproductive habits are inhibited, and that one must develop conscious awareness to change these habits.
The Alexander Technique (A.T.) is theoretically consistent with these principles and a considerable number of testimonial examples corroborate this consistency.
Since the 1950s a prolific number of A.T. and singing literature has been produced but only 8 research studies concerning the impact of A.T. in singers have been realized. These studies targeted different variables: the alignment of head and neck, changes in general physical profile, muscular tensions, performance anxiety, and “preparatory set”. Their results and quality differ greatly.
My research project will include more variables such as the breathing function and use objective measures such as spectrograms and the oximeter, as well as explore the qualitative aspects in which the A.T. enhances the kinaesthetic awareness in singers, like the release of tensions and changes of breathing/postural habits that affect the resonant voice with self-reported questionnaires.